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The Voyages Issue: How Do Families Around the World Spend Their Vacations?

Photo essays from around the world by Joakim Eskildsen, Moises Saman, Sim Chi Yin, Mark Neville, Mamadi Doumbouya, Massimo Vitali, Newsha Tavakolian, Justine Kurland and Christopher Anderson.

Monsanto’s Weed Killer, Dicamba, Divides Farmers

Twenty-five million acres have been planted with genetically modified seeds to encourage the spraying of the chemical. Farmers worry about damage to crops.

36 Hours: 36 Hours in Madrid

There has never been a better time to visit the Spanish capital, where the political and economic turmoil of the past decade has helped spur creativity and enterprise.

Op-Ed Columnist: Are We Down to President Pence?

The least we deserve is a less exciting finger on the trigger.

Someone Made a Fake Equifax Site. Then Equifax Linked to It.

A software engineer created a fake version of the website to draw attention to the weak security of the real one. Phishers could easily do the same.

How to Hack Your Brain (for $5,000)

The new, new, new age is all about “defragging our nervous systems.”

Aaron Hernandez Found to Have Severe C.T.E.

The former Patriots tight end was convicted of murder in 2015. He was found dead in his prison cell in April.

How to Find a Qualified Dog Trainer

Beyond wasting time and money, trainers who don’t know their stuff can cause psychological damage to your pet, possibly of the permanent kind.

Trilobites: Sea Turtles Appear to Be Bouncing Back Around the World

Researchers analyzed all existing public data of sea turtle nesting sites around the world and found a tale of “cautionary optimism.”

Liliane Bettencourt, L’Oréal Heiress Vexed by Swindling Case, Is Dead at 94

Mrs. Bettencourt, ranked as the world’s richest woman, tried to live down her family’s fascist associations, and her final years were overtaken by scandal.

Market Snapshot: Stocks retreat from records as Dow snaps nine-day winning streak

U.S. stocks finish lower Thursday with the Dow snapping a nine-day winning streak as investors found few reasons to chase equities a day after the Federal Reserve indicated it still intends to deliver another rate increase in 2017 and detailed the unwinding of $4.5 trillion balance sheet.

Market Snapshot: Dow, S&P 500 finish at records as Fed announces October start to ‘great unwind’

U.S. stock benchmarks end a volatile session mostly in the green, with the Dow and the S&P 500 carving out fresh all-time highs, as the Federal Reserve announced that, for the first time in nine years, it would start reducing the size of its $4.5 trillion asset portfolio commencing in October.

Market Snapshot: Longtime laggers, an ‘important turn is happening’ in energy stocks

U.S. stocks have been in a strong uptrend in 2017, hitting dozens of records, but they have achieved this feat without the contribution of a major sector: energy, which has sharply lagged behind the broader market for years. That could be about to change.

Market Snapshot: How much longer this stock-market bull lasts may depend on Fed’s next move

Wall Street investors have shrugged off recent worries to carve out fresh all-time highs, but the Federal Reserve’s policy meeting this week may provide investors the clearest sign yet about the health of the U.S. economy and how the central bank is construing stubbornly low inflation.

Market Snapshot: Stock market edges to new round of records as investors await Fed

All three main U.S. stock indexes end at all-time highs on Tuesday, as the Federal Reserve began its two-day policy meeting where they are expected to finalize the details on the unwinding of its $4.5 trillion balance sheet.

Fathers Pass On Four Times As Many New Genetic Mutations As Mothers, Says Study

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Children inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men's DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases. Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age. The figures mean that a child born to 30-year-old parents would, on average, inherit 11 new mutations from the mother, but 45 from the father. Kari Stefansson, a researcher at the Icelandic genetics company, deCODE, which led the study, said that while new mutations led to variation in the human genome, which is necessary for evolution to happen, "they are also believed to be responsible for the majority of cases of rare diseases in childhood." In the study published in Nature, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 1,500 Icelanders and their parents and, for 225 people, at least one of their children. They found that new mutations from mothers increased by 0.37 per year of age, a quarter of the rate found in men. While the vast majority of new mutations are thought to be harmless, occasionally they can disrupt the workings of genes that are important for good health.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Dear Apple, The iPhone X and Face ID Are Orwellian and Creepy'

Trent Lapinski from Hacker Noon writes an informal letter to Apple, asking "who the hell actually asked for Face ID?" and calling the iPhone X and new face-scanning security measure "Orwellian" and "creepy": For the company that famously used 1984 in its advertising to usher in a new era of personal computing, it is pretty ironic that 30+ years later they would announce technology that has the potential to eliminate global privacy. I've been waiting 10-years since the first iPhone was announced for a full-screen device that is both smaller in my hand but has a larger display and higher capacity battery. However, I do not want these features at the cost of my privacy, and the privacy of those around me. While the ease of use and user experience of Face ID is apparent, I am not questioning that, the privacy concerns are paramount in today's world of consistent security breaches. Given what we know from Wikileaks Vault7 and the CIA / NSA capabilities to hijack any iPhone, including any sensor on the phone, the very thought of handing any government a facial ID system for them to hack into is a gift the world may never be able to return. Face ID will have lasting privacy implications from 2017 moving forward, and I'm pretty sure I am not alone in not wanting to participate. The fact of the matter is the iPhone X does not need Face ID, Apple could have easily put a Touch ID sensor on the back of the phone for authentication (who doesn't place their finger on the back of their phone?). I mean imagine how cool it would be to put your finger on the Apple logo on the back of your iPhone for Touch ID? It would have been a highly marketable product feature that is equally as effective as Face ID without the escalating Orwellian privacy implications. [...] For Face ID to work, the iPhone X actively has to scan faces looking for its owner when locked. This means anyone within a several foot range of an iPhone X will get their face scanned by other people's phones and that's just creepy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla Discontinues Its Most Affordable Model S

Tesla will be discontinuing its cheapest Model S option, the Model S 75, this Sunday. What that means is that the all-wheel-drive version -- the 75D -- will take its place as the low-end Model S sedan, currently listed at a starting price of $74,500. Engadget reports: The move to discontinue the Model S 75 was first announced by Tesla in July after it dropped the price by $5,000 a few months earlier. The removal of the model from Tesla's offerings follows its discontinuation of the Model S 60 and 60D vehicles in April, which at the time were the least expensive Model S options available. As well as streamlining its EV line and making all Model S options all-wheel-drive, knocking off the low-end Model S vehicles is also likely being done to carve out a bigger separation between the Model 3 and Model S lines. Custom orders for the Model S 75 will be taken until Sunday, September 24th and the pre-configured versions will be available for purchase until inventory runs out.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ford Is Using Microsoft's HoloLens To Design Cars In Augmented Reality

Ford is using Microsoft's HoloLens headset to let designers quickly model out changes to cars, trucks, and SUVs in augmented reality. This allows designers to see the changes on top of an existing physical vehicle, instead of the traditional clay model approach to car design. The Verge reports: Ford is still using clay models, but the HoloLens can be used to augment additional 3D models without having to build every single design prototype with clay. It's one of the more interesting ways we've seen businesses use Microsoft's HoloLens, and it's something customers will never see. Microsoft is planning to hold a Windows Mixed Reality launch event on October 3rd in San Francisco. We're not expecting to hear about a HoloLens successor, but we should get a better idea of what apps and games we'll see coming for Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

DC Court Rules Tracking Phones Without a Warrant Is Unconstitutional

An anonymous reader writes: Law enforcement use of one tracking tool, the cell-site simulator, to track a suspect's phone without a warrant violates the Constitution, the D.C. Court of Appeals said Thursday in a landmark ruling for privacy and Fourth Amendment rights as they pertain to policing tactics. The ruling could have broad implications for law enforcement's use of cell-site simulators, which local police and federal agencies can use to mimic a cell phone tower to the phone connect to the device instead of its regular network. In a decision that reversed the decision of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and overturned the conviction of a robbery and sexual assault suspect, the D.C. Court of Appeals determined the use of the cell-site simulator "to locate a person through his or her cellphone invades the person's actual, legitimate and reasonable expectation of privacy in his or her location information and is a search."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.