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Op-Ed Contributor: How to Make Fun of Nazis

Don’t respond to fascists with violence. A German town offers some helpful tips.

Opinion: I Voted for Trump. And I Sorely Regret It.

I supported the president in dozens of articles, radio and TV appearances. I won’t do it any longer.

Op-Ed Columnist: The Other Inconvenient Truth

The Republican Party should acknowledge how it has fueled white supremacy.

A 2:15 Alarm, 2 Trains and a Bus Get Her to Work by 7 A.M.

Like many in the housing-starved San Francisco region, Sheila James has moved far inland, gaining affordable space at the price of a brutal commute.

Op-Ed Columnist: The Week When President Trump Resigned

This presidency isn’t just broken. It’s vacant.

Op-Ed Columnist: Trump Makes Caligula Look Pretty Good

Unlike the senators of ancient Rome, the Republican Congress won’t deal with a rogue leader.

36 Hours: 36 Hours in Cincinnati

Cincinnati is experiencing a boom, especially in the Over-the-Rhine district where rich cultural offerings and breweries thrive.

Op-Ed Columnist: How to Handle Donald Trump

What we don’t need to hear is what’s really on his mind.

Op-Ed Contributor: Jeff Flake: We Need Immigrants With Skills. But Working Hard Is a Skill.

Manuel didn’t speak much English. He didn’t have a degree. But America needs more people like him.

Trump Comments on Race Open Breach With C.E.O.s, Military and G.O.P.

President Trump was abandoned by executives, contradicted by military leaders and shunned by Republicans outraged by his defense of white nationalists.

Market Snapshot: Stocks end lower; Dow, S&P 500 book 2nd weekly loss in a row and Nasdaq logs 4th

U.S. stock benchmarks close firmly lower on Friday to register another unsightly week of losses as low volumes and skittish investors leave Wall Street especially vulnerable to pullbacks.

Market Snapshot: Stock market closes sharply lower as tech shares wither

U.S. stock benchmarks on Thursday finish down at least 1% as heightened concerns about President Donald Trump’s legislative agenda and news of a terrorist attack in Barcelona combine to foster selling on Wall Street.

Market Snapshot: Dow extends win streak to reclaim 22,000-mark on Fed minutes

U.S. stocks close moderately higher on Wednesday, with the Dow rising for a fourth day, after Federal Reserve minutes suggested that the central bank is wrestling with sluggish inflation but eager to commence an unwind of its $4.5 trillion asset portfolio.

Market Snapshot: Dow closes higher for 3rd session in a row, but broader market ends slightly lower

The Dow industrials manage to eke out a third day of gains, but overall the main benchmarks ended little changed amid better-then-expected retail sales data and an abatement of tensions between the U.S. and North Korea.

Market Snapshot: U.S. stocks gain 1% for the first time in 3 months as geopolitical fears ebb

U.S. stocks gain on Monday with the S&P 500 rising 1% for the first time in three months as the verbal standoff between the U.S. and North Korea cooled for now.

The Verge's Essential Phone Review: An Arcane Artifact From an Unrealized Future

An anonymous reader shares Dieter Bohn's review of the Essential Phone: Even though it was announced less than three months ago at the Code Conference, there's already enough mythology surrounding the Essential Phone to fill a book. It comes from a brand-new billion-dollar startup led by the person who helped create Android itself, Andy Rubin. That origin binds it up with the history of all smartphones in a way that doesn't usually apply to your run-of-the-mill device. The phone was also delayed a bit, a sign that this tiny company hasn't yet quite figured out how to punch above its weight class -- which it's certainly trying to do. Although it runs standard Android, it's meant to act as a vanguard for Essential's new ecosystem of smart home devices and services connected by the mysterious Ambient OS. Even if we trust that Rubin's futuristic vision for a connected home will come to pass, it's not going to happen overnight. Instead, all we really have right now is that future's harbinger, a well-designed Android phone that I've been testing for the past week. Available unlocked or at Sprint, the $699 Essential Phone is an ambitious device. It has a unique way to connect modular accessories, starting with a 360-degree camera. It has a bold take on how to make a big, edge-to-edge screen paired with top-flight materials such as ceramic and titanium. And it has a dual camera system that is meant to compete with other flagship devices without adding any thickness to the phone. That would be a lot for even a massive company like Samsung or Apple to try to do with a single phone. For a tiny company like Essential, the question is simply this: is it trying to do too much? In conclusion, Bohn writes: "The Essential Phone is doing so much right: elegant design, big screen, long battery life, and clean software. And on top of all that, it has ambitions to do even more with those modules. If you asked Android users what they wanted in the abstract, I suspect a great many of them would describe this exact device. But while the camera is pretty good, it doesn't live up to the high bar the rest of the phone market has set. Sometimes artifacts are better to behold than they are to use."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Self-sufficient Eclipse Chasers Hit the Road To 'Totality'

An anonymous reader shares a report: Michael Zeiler packed his portable toilet then headed out on a 10-hour drive from New Mexico to Wyoming where, on Monday, he intends to mark the ninth time he has seen the moon pass in front of the sun in a total solar eclipse. Zeiler is a self-described "eclipse chaser," part of a group of avid astronomy buffs, telescope hobbyists and amateur photographers whose passion for such celestial events takes them to the far corners of the earth. For the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the United States in almost a century, and the first visible anywhere in the Lower 48 states since 1979, Zeiler had only to drive some 650 miles (1,046 km) from the desert Southwest to the Rockies. He showed up prepared and early on Wednesday at his destination in Casper, Wyoming, within the "path of totality," the corridor over which the moon's 70-mile-wide shadow will be cast as it crosses the United States over 93 minutes. Along that path at the height of the eclipse on Aug. 21, the sun will be completely blotted out except for its outer atmosphere, known as the corona.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Info on 1.8M Chicago Voters Was Publicly Accessible, But Now Removed From Cloud Service

A file containing the names, addresses, dates of birth and other information about Chicago's 1.8 million registered voters was published online and publicly accessible for an unknown period of time, the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners said this week. From a report: The acknowledgment came days after a data security researcher alerted officials to the existence of the unsecured files. The researcher found the files while conducting a search of items uploaded to Amazon Web Services, a cloud system that allows users to rent storage space and share files with certain people or the general public. The files had been uploaded by Election Systems & Software, a contractor that helps maintain Chicago's electronic poll books. Election Systems said in a statement that the files "did not include any ballot information or vote totals and were not in any way connected to Chicago's voting or tabulation systems." The company said it had "promptly secured" the files on Saturday evening and had launched "a full investigation, with the assistance of a third-party firm, to perform thorough forensic analyses of the AWS server." State and local officials were notified of the existence of the files Saturday by cybersecurity expert Chris Vickery, who works at the Mountain View, Calif. firm UpGuard.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

YouTube Music Head Says Company Pays Higher Royalties Than Spotify in US

An anonymous reader shares a report: Making a living from streaming royalties is tough for music artists, and YouTube has had one of the worst reputations in the music industry for a while. Even Lyor Cohen, the current head of YouTube Music, knows that many are skeptical about the service's ability to pay out a legitimate rate. Cohen wrote a blog post this week to explain why he thinks that YouTube deserves another chance, and that his company is the highest paying music streaming service out there. The former road manager for Run DMC has been at YouTube for eight months now. He believes that YouTube music got to the subscription party late, which allowed companies like Spotify, Pandora and Apple Music to take an early lead. He also says that ads in music videos aren't the "death of the music industry," but rather a second supplement to bring in the money. Cohen claims that YouTube's ads brought in more than a billion dollars in the past 12 months. That should help soothe the music industry itself, but what about artists? Cohen rebuts the common belief that YouTube pays less than Spotify or Pandora, saying that his service pays more than $3 per thousand streams in the US, "more than other ad supported services."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A 'Netflix Tax'? Yes, and It's Already a Thing in Some States

An anonymous reader shares a report: Your monthly bill for Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and other streaming entertainment services could go up soon as states such as Illinois try to find ways to offset declining sales taxes and other revenue shortfalls. Chicago, Pennsylvania and Florida have already passed a so-called Netflix tax, and cities such as Pasadena, Calif. have broached the issue. These taxes can translate to additional fees of less than $1 each month to consumers. But over the months -- and tacked onto multiple streaming subscriptions -- they might add up to $50 or more each year. Netflix, consumer tax groups and tech trade organizations have voiced their opposition to such taxes, warning they can be unfair and deter innovation. Some opponents have initiated legal challenges, and at least one state has shelved plans after a court decision. But state and local governments aren't likely to halt fresh efforts as falling pay-TV subscriptions and video rentals mean there's less opportunity to tax cable bills or charge sales tax at the cash register.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.