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Feature: Why Are More American Teenagers Than Ever Suffering From Severe Anxiety?

Parents, therapists and schools are struggling to figure out whether helping anxious teenagers means protecting them or pushing them to face their fears.

Feature: When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy

As a young social psychologist, she played by the rules and won big: an influential study, a viral TED talk, a prestigious job at Harvard. Then, suddenly, the rules changed.

Op-Ed Columnist: Trump Isn’t Hitler. But the Lying …

The president has manipulated the American people with outrageous lies.

Blood and Beauty on a Texas Exotic-Game Ranch

In the hill country outside San Antonio, a safari-style world of rare and endangered species symbolizes the popularity and controversy of exotic game hunting.

F.D.A. Approves Second Gene-Altering Treatment for Cancer

The treatment will be for adults with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma when chemotherapy has failed. It re-engineers a patient’s own cells to fight cancer.

Simple Ways to Be Better at Remembering

Memory is a reconstruction, not a photographic recording. Our brains — unlike computers — are forever rerecording those memories.

Op-Ed Contributor: Lupita Nyong’o: Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein

I don’t feel alone anymore. Let us never shut up about this.

Op-Ed Columnist: ‘Drug Dealers in Lab Coats’

Big Pharma has helped get America hooked on opioids.

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Democracy Can Plant the Seeds of Its Own Destruction

The advent of Trumpism is a symptom of the erosion of our basic institutions.

On Campus: College Advice I Wish I’d Taken

I’m a teacher, but as an undergraduate, I was the type of mediocre student I now disdain.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Dow shake off ghost of 1987 crash to finish at records

The S&P 500 and the Dow overcame selling pressure Thursday to finish at records as Wall Street quietly commemorated the 30th anniversary of the 1987 crash.

Market Snapshot: Dow ends at 23,000 for the first time, as all stock benchmarks log fresh records

All three major equity indexes on Wednesday close at records simultaneously for the 23rd time in 2017 as U.S. stocks rode the latest round of corporate earnings to test new highs.

Market Snapshot: Dow, S&P 500 end at records, boosted by health care stocks

U.S. stocks mostly rose on Tuesday, with both the Dow and the S&P 500 ending at records as a round of positive earnings reports from major companies boosted positive sentiment and extended the recent uptrend.

Market Snapshot: All major stock indexes score records as investors await slew of earnings

U.S. stocks close higher Monday, with all three major indexes logging another round of records, as investors looked ahead to key corporate earnings reports that could set the tone for trading and determine whether the lofty levels of the equity market are justified.

Market Snapshot: Stock market ends, day week with a gain; Nasdaq logs 57th all-time high

U.S. equity benchmarks end the session and the week slightly higher on Friday, while the Nasdaq records an all-time high, as President Donald Trump delivered a speech decertifying a nuclear agreement with Iran.

Senators Announce New Bill That Would Regulate Online Political Ads

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: As tech companies face continued scrutiny over Russian activity on their ad platforms, Senators today announced legislation meant to regulate political ads on the internet. The new bill, called the Honest Ads Act, would require companies like Facebook and Google to keep copies of political ads and make them publicly available. Under the act, the companies would also be required to release information on who those ads were targeted to, as well as information on the buyer and the rates charged for the ads. The new rules would bring disclosure rules more in line with how political ads are regulated in mediums like print and TV, and apply to any platform with more than 50 million monthly viewers. The companies would be required to keep and release data on anyone spending more than $500 on political ads in a year. It's unclear how well the bill will fare. Companies like Facebook have been successfully fighting regulations for years. But this latest attempt has some bipartisan support: the act, sponsored by Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) is also co-sponsored by Sen. John McCain (R-AZ). "Americans deserve to know who's paying for the online ads," Klobuchar said at a press conference announcing the legislation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Denuvo's DRM Now Being Cracked Within Hours of Release

Denuvo, an anti-tamper technology and digital rights management scheme, isn't doing a very good job preventing PC games from being copied. According to Ars Technica, Denuvo releases are being publicly cracked within a day of their launch. From the report: This week's release of South Park: The Fractured but Whole is the latest to see its protections broken less than 24 hours after its release, but it's not alone. Middle Earth: Shadow of War was broken within a day last week, and last month saw cracks for Total War: Warhammer 2 and FIFA 18 the very same day as their public release. Then there's The Evil Within 2, which reportedly used Denuvo in prerelease review copies but then launched without that protection last week, effectively ceding the game to immediate potential piracy. Those nearly instant Denuvo cracks follow summer releases like Sonic Mania, Tekken 7, and Prey, all of which saw DRM protection cracked within four to nine days of release. But even that small difference in the "uncracked" protection window can be important for game publishers, who usually see a large proportion of their legitimate sales in those first few days of availability. The presence of an easy-to-find cracked version in that launch window (or lack thereof) could have a significant effect on the initial sales momentum for a big release. If Denuvo can no longer provide even a single full day of protection from cracks, though, that protection is going to look a lot less valuable to publishers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Verizon Loses 18,000 Pay TV Subscribers, Signals Delay For Live TV Streaming Service

Verizon announced on Thursday that its FiOS video service lost 18,000 net pay TV subscribers in the third quarter, compared with the addition of 36,000 subscribers in the year-ago period and 15,000 subscriber drop in the second quarter. Hollywood Reporter reports: The company said the drop in the latest quarter was "reflecting the ongoing shift from traditional linear video to over-the-top offerings." Verizon, led by chairman and CEO Lowell McAdam, ended the third quarter with a total of 4.6 million subscribers to its FiOS video service, which competes with cable and satellite TV companies. Asked about a planned over-the-top (OTT) TV service from Verizon, Ellis said that the company continues to feel that "there's an opportunity for us to play," but signaling a delay, he emphasized that the company "doesn't want to launch a me-too product." He didn't provide any guidance on when the OTT service would launch, saying that was still "TBD" (to be determined), or what content it could offer beyond saying it was likely to be built "around live programming." Verizon also reported Thursday that it added 66,000 net new FiOS broadband connections in the third quarter to end it with 5.8 million.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How Google's Pixel 2 'Now Playing' Song Identification Works

An anonymous reader shares a report from VentureBeat, written by Emil Protalinski: The most interesting Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL feature, to me, is Now Playing. If you've ever used Shazam or SoundHound, you probably understand the basics: The app uses your device's microphone to capture an audio sample and creates an acoustic fingerprint to compare against a central song database. If a match is found, information such as the song title and artist are sent back to the user. Now Playing achieves this with two important differentiators. First, Now Playing detects songs automatically without you explicitly asking -- the feature works when your phone is locked and the information is displayed on the Pixel 2's lock screen (you'll eventually be able to ask Google Assistant what's currently playing, but not yet). Secondly, it's an on-device and local feature: Now Playing functions completely offline (we tested this, and indeed it works with mobile data and Wi-Fi turned off). No audio is ever sent to Google.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon Spends $350K On Seattle Mayor's Race

reifman writes: Until this summer, Amazon had never contributed more than $15,000 to a city political campaign in Seattle, but this year's different. The company is a lead funder in the Seattle Chamber of Commerce's PAC which dropped $525,000 Monday on Jenny Durkan's PAC, the centrist business candidate. Her opponent Cary Moon is an advocate for affordable housing, which complicates Amazon's growth, and city-owned community broadband. Comcast and Century Link joined Amazon contributing $25,000 and $82,500 respectively to the Chamber's PAC. Amazon's $350,000 contribution represents .00014 of its CY 2016 net profit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.