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111 N.F.L. Brains. All But One Had C.T.E.

A neuropathologist has examined the brains of 111 N.F.L. players — and 110 were found to have C.T.E., the degenerative disease linked to repeated blows to the head.

It’s High Time for Ticks, Which Are Spreading Diseases Farther

The disease-carrying blood suckers are spreading more pathogens and putting more Americans at risk for rare illnesses.

Personal Health: The Subtle Signs of a Thyroid Disorder

Routine blood tests may fail to detect insufficient thyroid hormone, leaving patients without an accurate explanation for their symptoms.

News Analysis: Why Women Aren’t C.E.O.s, According to Women Who Almost Were

It’s not a pipeline problem. It’s about loneliness, competition and deeply rooted barriers.

Are You a Carboholic? Why Cutting Carbs Is So Tough

Eating a little of a tasty dessert doesn’t satisfy me — it creates a fierce craving to eat it all, and then some.

Op-Ed Columnist: Self-Driving People, Enabled by Airbnb

The company known for room rentals now offers guided “experiences.”

England’s Mental Health Experiment: No-Cost Talk Therapy

The two creators of the program concluded that providing therapy, creating a system of primary care for mental health, made economic sense.

Economy Needs Workers, but Drug Tests Take a Toll

Employers say they are having trouble filling jobs because too many applicants can’t pass screening, a factor depressing the labor participation rate.

Traces of Controversial Herbicide Are Found in Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream

The ice cream brand joins the list of food companies that are grappling with trace amounts of glyphosate in their products.

Feature: The Majestic Marble Quarries of Northern Italy

Fueled by insatiable demand in the gulf states, the Italian marble trade is booming. A look at how the stone is wrenched from the earth.

Market Snapshot: U.S. stocks trade in record territory ahead of Fed policy decision

U.S. stock indexes set a new round of records Wednesday on the latest batch of upbeat earnings from heavyweights Boeing Co. and AT&T Inc., before investors shift their focus to the Federal Reserve‘s monetary policy decision announcement.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq finish at records as investors cheer earnings

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq closed at records Tuesday, following better-than-expected results from bellwether companies, the latest sign that equity valuations may be supported by activity in American corporations.

Market Snapshot: Nasdaq closes at record as tech stocks shake off broader weakness

U.S. stocks close mostly lower but the Nasdaq bucks the trend.

Market Snapshot: Stocks brace for volatility in earnings deluge; Fed meeting looms

With nearly a fifth of earnings reports out, investors are divided on how early corporate reports are serving as an indicator of the overall health of the U.S. economy, and that could contribute to a volatile week as stocks linger near record highs.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq post weekly gains as stock market finishes session lower

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq extend gains for a third week.

Some Low-Cost Android Phones Come at a Price -- Your Privacy

Cheap phones are coming at the price of your privacy, security analysts discovered. From a report: At $60, the BLU R1 HD is the top-selling phone on Amazon. Last November, researchers caught it secretly sending private data to China. Shanghai Adups Technology, the group behind the spying software on the BLU R1 HD, called it a mistake. But analysts at Kryptowire found the software provider is still making the same "mistake" on other phones. At the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas on Wednesday, researchers from Kryptowire, a security firm, revealed that Adups' software is still sending a device's data to the company's server in Shanghai without alerting people. But now, it's being more secretive about it. "They replaced them with nicer versions," Ryan Johnson, a research engineer and co-founder at Kryptowire, said. "I have captured the network traffic of them using the Command and Control channel when they did it." An Adups spokeswoman said that it had resolved the issues in 2016 and that the issues "are not existing anymore." Kryptowire said it has observed the company sending data without telling users on at least three different phones.

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Apple-Supplier Foxconn To Announce New Factory in Wisconsin in Much-needed Win For Trump and Scott Walker

An anonymous reader shares a Washington Post report: Foxconn, one of the world's largest electronics manufacturers, will unveil plans Wednesday evening to build a new factory in southeastern Wisconsin (alternative source), delivering a much-needed win for President Trump and Gov. Scott Walker, according to four officials with knowledge of the announcement. The facility will make flat-screen displays and will be located in Southeast Wisconsin within House Speaker Paul Ryan's congressional district. It is not clear how many jobs would be created. Shortly after Trump was elected, Foxconn's chairman Terry Gou said his company would invest at least $7 billion in the United States and create between 30,000 and 50,000 jobs. If it follows through with that commitment, Foxconn would become a major employer on par with Chrysler. In April, Gou spent more than two hours at the White House.

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New Diesel and Petrol Vehicles To Be Banned From 2040 In UK

New submitter puenktli writes: The UK is joining the list of the countries which are making a commitment towards diesel and petrol free vehicles. Other countries might be more progressive with such a ban (e.g. the Netherlands: by 2025), but at least it's a step in the right direction. However, if new bans are put forward at such a high rate as now, in 2040, the UK might be the only western country where petrol-fuelled cars are still on the road. Tesla at least will be happy about this ban, especially now with their Model 3. But these bans will inspire other car makers as well to invest more in EV. Maybe not such a bad idea after all: oil will run out one day, but the sun will always shine.

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Kaspersky Launches Its Free Antivirus Software Worldwide

Kaspersky has finally launched its free antivirus software after a year-and-a-half of testing it in select regions. From a report: While the software was only available in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, China and in Nordic countries during its trial run, Kaspersky is releasing it worldwide. The free antivirus doesn't have VPN, Parental Controls and Online Payment Protection its paid counterpart offers, but it has all the essential features you need to protect your PC. It can scan files and emails, protect your PC while you use the web and quarantine malware that infects your system. The company says the software isn't riddled with advertisements like other free antivirus offerings. Instead of trying to make ad money off your patronage, Kaspersky will use the data you contribute to improve machine learning across its products. The free antivirus will be available in the US, Canada and most Asia-Pacific countries over the next couple of days, if it isn't yet. After this initial release, the company will roll it out in other regions from September to November.

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How Jony Ive Masterminded Apple's New Headquarters

Reader cdreimer writes: As reported by The Wall Street Journal (paywalled, summary by Apple Insider), Jony Ive explains how he brought forth Steve Jobs' final design, Apple Park, Apple's newest campus headquarters, to life: "On a sunny day in May, Jonathan Ive -- Jony to anyone who knows him -- first encounters a completed section of Apple Park, the giant campus in Cupertino, California, that has turned into one of his longest projects as Apple's chief designer. A section of workspace in the circular, Norman Foster -- designed building is finally move-in-ready: sliding-glass doors on the soundproof offices, a giant European white oak collaboration table, adjustable-height desks, and floors with aluminum-covered hinged panels, hiding cables and wires, and brushed-steel grating for air diffusion. Ive's characteristically understated reaction -- "It's nice, though, isn't it?" -- masks the anxiety he feels each time a product he's designed is about to be introduced to the world. "There's the same rather strange process you go through when you finish a product and you prepare to release it -- it's the same set of feelings," says Ive, who turned 50 in February. "That feels, I don't know, encouragingly healthy, because I would be concerned if we lost that sense of anxiety. I think that would suggest that we were not as self-critical, not as curious, not as inquisitive as we have to be to be able to be effective and do good work." Apple Park is unlike any other product Ive has worked on. There will be only one campus -- in contrast to the ubiquity of Apple's phones and computers -- and it doesn't fit in a pocket or a hand. Yet Ive applied the same design process he brings to technological devices: prototyping to minimize any issues with the end result and to narrow what he calls the delta between the vision and the reality of a project. Apple Park is also the last major project Ive worked on with Steve Jobs, making it more personal for the man Jobs once called his "spiritual partner.""

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