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Feature: The Ethereal Genius of Craig Taborn

He has become one of the best jazz pianists alive — by disappearing almost completely into his music.

Adolescence: No, Your Teen Doesn’t Hate You. It’s Just Summer.

When teenagers retreat to their rooms, it’s probably nothing personal.

A Cyberattack ‘the World Isn’t Ready For’

In May, a so-called ransomware attack hit computers in over 150 countries. But two weeks earlier, one security expert found something a lot worse.

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Justice Ginsburg and the Price of Equality

In a decision with an unexpected ending, the justice struck a blow against another law that treated men and women differently.

Op-Ed Columnist: You’ve Named Trump’s Worst!

All the cabinet members tried, but only one could triumph.

When Helicopter Parents Hover Even at Work

The father of the basketball star Lonzo Ball has taken an assertive role in his son’s career, reflecting a larger trend as millennials come of age.

The Symptoms of Dying

Whether you have cancer or heart disease or diabetes, dying has its own biology and symptoms. It’s a diagnosis in itself.

A Kansas Investment Firm Spurring Change on Wall Street

Creative Planning is at the vanguard of a profound shift in finance — from firms peddling products for a fee toward independent, low-cost advice.

The Kiwis’ Edge in America’s Cup: Drones

Nick Bowers uses drones to shoot spectacular sailing footage, which earned him a place with innovative Team New Zealand, an America’s Cup finalist.

Op-Ed Contributors: They Brushed Off Kamala Harris. Then She Brushed Us Off.

We went to the Senate to testify about the brutal experience of women under Islamist rule. But the Democratic senators ignored us.

Market Snapshot: Stocks close mostly lower as financials, consumer staples weigh

U.S. stocks benchmarks trade slightly higher Thursday, with afternoon gains driven by a rally in the health-care and biotechnology sectors.

Market Snapshot: Stock market ends mostly lower as oil slumps

Stocks are putting in a mixed performance as investors keep an eye on slumping oil prices.

Market Snapshot: Stock market closes lower as oil slips into bear-market territory

U.S. stocks on Tuesday pull back from record territory, as investors dump energy shares following a sharp drop in oil prices.

Market Snapshot: Dow, S&P 500 end at records as tech shares rebound

U.S. stocks rise on Monday, with both the Dow and the S&P 500 ending at new records as technology shares rebound from a recent bout of sharp weakness to lead the market higher.

Market Snapshot: Tech selloff remains a concern after Fed hike, tepid economic growth

As tech shares continue to sell off, investors are focusing more on how that market leading sector will dictate the direction of the broader benchmarks in the coming week as the Federal Reserve has signaled a commitment to tightening and economic data remains lackluster.

Netflix Launches New 'Interactive Shows' That Let Viewers Dictate the Story

Netflix announced that it's launching an all-new interactive format that turns viewers in storytellers, letting them dictate each choice and direction the story takes. "In each interactive title, you can make choices for the characters, shaping the story as you go," according to Netflix. "Each choice leads to a different adventure, so you can watch again and again, and see a new story each time." The Next Web reports: The first two interactive shows that will be available on Netflix are Puss in Book: Trapped in an Epic Tale and Buddy Thunderstruck: The Maybe Pile. Puss in Book launches globally today, with Buddy Thunderstruck slated to make its debut a month from now on July 14. The new experience will be available on most television setups and iOS devices. "Content creators have a desire to tell non-linear stories like these, and Netflix provides the freedom to roam, try new things and do their best work," Product Innovation director Carla Fisher said. "The intertwining of our engineers in Silicon Valley and the creative minds in Hollywood has opened up this new world of storytelling possibilities." Fisher further added that, for the time being, the streaming service will be mainly focusing its efforts on producing interactive content for children -- especially since their research has shown that they already tend to be prone to interacting with the screen.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

ESA Approves Gravitational-Wave Hunting Spacecraft For 2034

The European Space Agency has approved the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission designed to study gravitational waves in space. The spacecraft is slated for launch in in 2034. New Scientist reports: LISA will be made up of three identical satellites orbiting the sun in a triangle formation, each 2.5 million kilometers from the next. The sides of the triangle will be powerful lasers bounced to and fro between the spacecraft. As large objects like black holes move through space they cause gravitational waves, ripples which stretch and squeeze space-time. The LISA satellites will detect how these waves warp space via tiny changes in the distance the laser beams travel. In order to detect these minuscule changes, on scales less than a trillionth of a meter, LISA will have to shrug off cosmic rays and the particles and light from the sun. The LISA Pathfinder mission, a solo probe launched in December 2015, proved that this sensitivity was possible and galvanized researchers working to realize the full LISA mission.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Scientists Discover How To Stop Luggage From Toppling On the Race Through the Airport

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Scientists have worked out why suitcases tend to to rock violently from one wheel to the other until they overturn on the race through the airport. This most pressing of modern mysteries was taken on by physicists in Paris, who devised a scale model of a two-wheeled suitcase rolling on a treadmill and backed up their observations with a pile of equations and references to holonomic restraints, finite perturbations and the morphing of bifurcation diagrams. Fortunately for non-physicists, the findings can be reduced to simpler terms. For the suitcase to rock it had to hit a bump or be struck in some other manner; the faster the suitcase was being pulled, the more minor the bump needed to set it off. So far, so obvious. But Sylvain Courrech du Pont wanted to know more. Why did a rocking suitcase swerve and make such violent movements that it might eventually topple over? After more treadmill tests and more equations, the answer popped up: because a suitcase's handle pulls from the middle and the wheels are at its sides, the suitcase swerves inwards whenever it tilts up on one wheel. If the rocking overcomes the dampening effect that happens when each wheel touches the ground again, the suitcase will keep on rocking or eventually flip over. In conclusion, the researchers discovered that "when a suitcase starts to rock out of control, the correct response is not to slow down but to pull it faster." The scientists have published their findings in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society.

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Home Improvement Chains Accused of False Advertising Over Lumber Dimensions

per unit analyzer writes: According to Consumerist, an attorney has filed a class-action lawsuit charging Home Depot (PDF) and Menards (PDF) with deceptive advertising practices by selling "lumber products that were falsely advertised and labeled as having product dimensions that were not the actual dimensions of the products sold." Now granted, this may be news to the novice DIYer, but overall most folks who are purchasing lumber at home improvement stores know that the so-called trade sizes don't match the actual dimensions of the lumber. Do retailers need to educate naive consumers about every aspect of the items they sell? (Especially industry quirks such as this...) Furthermore, as the article notes, it's hard to see how the plaintiffs have been damaged when these building materials are compatible with the construction of the purchaser's existing buildings. i.e., An "actual" 2x4 would not fit in a wall previously built with standard 2x4s -- selling the something as advertised would actually cause the purchaser more trouble in many cases.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

McDonald's Hits All-Time High As Wall Street Cheers Replacement of Cashiers With Kiosks

McDonald's is expected to increase its sales via new digital ordering kiosks that will replace cashiers in 2,500 restaurants. As a result, the company's shares hit an all-time high, rallying 26 percent this year through Monday. CNBC reports: Andrew Charles from Cowen cited plans for the restaurant chain to roll out mobile ordering across 14,000 U.S. locations by the end of 2017. The technology upgrades, part of what McDonald's calls "Experience of the Future," includes digital ordering kiosks that will be offered in 2,500 restaurants by the end of the year and table delivery. "MCD is cultivating a digital platform through mobile ordering and Experience of the Future (EOTF), an in-store technological overhaul most conspicuous through kiosk ordering and table delivery," Charles wrote in a note to clients Tuesday. "Our analysis suggests efforts should bear fruit in 2018 with a combined 130 bps [basis points] contribution to U.S. comps [comparable sales]." He raised his 2018 U.S. same store sales growth estimate for the fast-food chain to 3 percent from 2 percent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.