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The Coat of Arms Said ‘Integrity.’ Now It Says ‘Trump.’

The emblem used by the Trump Organization in the United States had to be changed in Britain, since it belongs to another family.

Jared Kushner’s Role Is Tested as Russia Case Grows

It is unclear how Jared Kushner’s high-profile woes will affect his hard-won partnership with his father-in-law, perhaps the most stable in an often unstable White House.

Op-Ed Columnist: Trump’s Energy, Low and Dirty

Risking the planet to keep a lie alive.

Merkel, After Discordant G-7 Meeting, Is Looking Past Trump

After President Trump declined to endorse NATO’s doctrine of collective defense and the Paris climate pact, the German leader said Europe should “take our fate into our own hands.”

Op-Ed Columnist: Donald Trump: The Gateway Degenerate

Republicans in the age of Trump have sadly moved away from morality as a viable concept.

Immigrants Keep an Iowa Meatpacking Town Alive and Growing

Waves of Asian, African and Latino newcomers have filled jobs at pork, egg and turkey plants where wages have fallen and work has grown more grueling.

Sidebar: A Constitutional Puzzle: Can the President Be Indicted?

The Constitution includes detailed instructions for impeachment. But there’s no clear answer on whether a president may be criminally prosecuted.

How a Candy Heir Sneaked Into Pro Hockey and Made His Name as a ‘Savage’

Nello Ferrara was being groomed to take the reins of a famed confectioner, but chose to cobble together a decade-long career with 19 minor league teams.

The Stone: In Praise of Lost Causes

Futilely resisting a corrupt world is not a matter of common sense, but of conscience.

Op-Ed Columnist: 11 Years Old, a Mom, and Pushed to Marry Her Rapist in Florida

Thousands of minors wed each year in the United States. Many are given no choice.

Market Snapshot: U.S. stock futures point to slight decline from record levels

U.S. stock-index futures on Tuesday are set to retreat slightly from last week’s record levels, though the market’s uptrend remains intact following a multisession rally.

Market Snapshot: U.S. stock futures inch higher ahead of packed data week

U.S. stock futures post mild gains in holiday-thinned trade on Monday, ahead of a heavy week on the data front including consumer-confidence and nonfarm-payrolls numbers.

Market Snapshot: Consumer confidence, jobs to highlight packed stock-market week

Investors will surface from their long weekend to greet a data packed week as stocks push against record levels in a time of fundamental strength but political uncertainty.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq book narrow records ahead of Memorial Day weekend

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite logged tiny gains on Friday, but they were enough for the benchmarks to finish in record territory and book a seventh straight advance, ahead of the long Memorial Day weekend.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq close at records as stock market extends win streak to a 6th day

The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite close at fresh records on Thursday as U.S. stocks advanced for a sixth straight session, thanks in part to big gains in shares of Best Buy after quarterly results.

Android Creator Andy Rubin Launches Top-of-the-line Essential Phone

The much-anticipated smartphone from Andy Rubin, the creator of Android, is here. It's called the Essential Phone, and it runs a custom version of Android. Priced at $699, the Essential Phone offers top-of-the-line specifications including "an edge-to-edge display that one-ups even the Samsung Galaxy S8 by bringing it all the way to the the top of the phone, wrapping around the front-facing selfie camera." From a report on The Verge: It's a unique take on a big screen that makes the phone stand out -- and it's smart too. Often, the status bar at the top of an Android phone doesn't fill that middle space with icons, so it's efficient. The screen does leave some bezel at the bottom of the phone, but nevertheless it's as close to the whole front of a phone being display as I've seen. Essential is launching the phone in the US to start, and it's filled the phone with radios that should make it work on all major carriers, alongside usual Android flagship internals like a Qualcomm 835 processor, 4GB of RAM, and 128GB of storage. [...] Essential will ship a 360-degree camera that can click in to the top of the phone, and the company will also offer a charging dock. Both connect to the phone with small metal pogo pins. They won't entirely replace USB-C for most people, but Essential is clearly hoping that they could someday. Speaking of ports, there is no traditional 3.5mm headphone jack -- which is a bummer. We're told that it will ship with a headphone dongle in the box.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Get Real, Microsoft: If the New Surface Pro Is a Laptop, Bundle It With a Type Cover

An anonymous reader shares an article: If Microsoft sold cars like it's trying to sell its Surface Pro (2017), it would charge extra for wheels -- and would be laughed out of the market. But Microsoft's using this tactic to sell its new Windows tablet as a "laptop," and we're still trying to figure out why. Microsoft's Surface Pro is clearly a Windows tablet, just like its predecessor, the Surface Pro 4. Nevertheless, devices chief Panos Panay calls it a "laptop" no fewer than three times in his blog post, including the very first sentence. No "laptop" or notebook PC forgoes a keyboard, however, as the Surface Pro does. Long-time Surface fans may know that Microsoft charges $129 to $159 more for that accessory, but does the average buyer get it? That's where the confusion starts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

China To Implement Cyber Security Law From Thursday

China, battling increased threats from cyber-terrorism and hacking, will adopt from Thursday a controversial law that mandates strict data surveillance and storage for firms working in the country, the official Xinhua news agency said. From a report: The law, passed in November by the country's largely rubber-stamp parliament, bans online service providers from collecting and selling users' personal information, and gives users the right to have their information deleted, in cases of abuse. "Those who violate the provisions and infringe on personal information will face hefty fines," the news agency said on Monday, without elaborating.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Wikipedia's Switch To HTTPS Has Successfully Fought Government Censorship

Determining how to prevent acts of censorship has long been a priority for the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, and thanks to new research from the Harvard Center for Internet and Society, the foundation seems to have found a solution: encryption. From a report: HTTPS prevents governments and others from seeing the specific page users are visiting. For example, a government could tell that a user is browsing Wikipedia, but couldn't tell that the user is specifically reading the page about Tiananmen Square. Up until 2015, Wikipedia offered its service using both HTTP and HTTPS, which meant that when countries like Pakistan or Iran blocked the certain articles on the HTTP version of Wikipedia, the full version would still be available using HTTPS. But in June 2015, Wikipedia decided to axe HTTP access and only offer access to its site with HTTPS. [...] The Harvard researchers began by deploying an algorithm which detected unusual changes in Wikipedia's global server traffic for a year beginning in May 2015. This data was then combined with a historical analysis of the daily request histories for some 1.7 million articles in 286 different languages from 2011 to 2016 in order to determine possible censorship events. [...] After a painstakingly long process of manual analysis of potential censorship events, the researchers found that, globally, Wikipedia's switch to HTTPS had a positive effect on the number censorship events by comparing server traffic from before and after the switch in June of 2015.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

India's Ethical Hackers Rewarded Abroad, Ignored at Home

An anonymous reader shares an article: Kanishk Sajnani did not receive so much as a thank you from a major Indian airline when he contacted them with alarming news -- he had hacked their website and could book flights anywhere in the world for free. It was a familiar tale for India's army of "ethical hackers," who earn millions protecting foreign corporations and global tech giants from cyber attacks but are largely ignored at home, their skills and altruism misunderstood or distrusted. India produces more ethical hackers -- those who break into computer networks to expose, rather than exploit, weaknesses -- than anywhere else in the world. The latest data from BugCrowd, a global hacking network, showed Indians raked in the most "bug bounties" -- rewards for red-flagging security loopholes. Facebook, which has long tapped hacker talent, paid more to Indian researchers in the first half of 2016 than any other researchers. Indians outnumbered all other bug hunters on HackerOne, another registry of around 100,000 hackers. One anonymous Indian hacker -- "Geekboy" -- has found more than 700 vulnerabilities for companies like Yahoo, Uber and Rockstar Games. Most are young "techies" -- software engineers swelling the ranks of India's $154-billion IT outsourcing sector whose skill set makes them uniquely gifted at cracking cyber systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.