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Harvey Weinstein Is My Monster Too

He threatened to shut down “Frida” if I didn’t comply with his demands.

Trump’s Lies vs. Obama’s

President Trump’s supporters asked us to compare. We did.

Hacking the Tax Plan: 13 Ways to Profit Off the Republican Tax Bill

Some strategies are straightforward; others fiendishly difficult. For many you’ll need to act fast.

Top New York Restaurants of 2017

Pete Wells’s 10 favorites feature cuisines, and chefs, from Uruguay to South Korea.

Op-Ed Contributor: A G.O.P. Tragedy in Four Acts

Republicans embraced Trump, Moore and post-ethics politics. In defeat, they are officially post-shame.

Why the Getty Center’s Art Stayed Put as Fires Raged Nearby

How the Getty Center protects its art from wildfires.

How Effective Is Your School District? A New Measure Shows Where Students Learn the Most

Some poorer districts do more for their grade-schoolers than some wealthier ones do.

36 Hours: 36 Hours in Cork, Ireland (and Beyond)

Don’t overlook Ireland’s second city, with its many churches, pubs, local beers and an increasingly diverse array of restaurants.

Exercise May Aid Parkinson’s Disease, but Make It Intense

Vigorous treadmill exercise was safe and slowed progression of Parkinson’s disease, a new study reports.

Once a Long Shot, Democrat Doug Jones Wins Alabama Senate Race

Doug Jones, a former prosecutor, defeated scandal-scarred Roy S. Moore for the Senate seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

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Amazon Will Resume Selling Apple TV, Google's Chromecast

Ina Fried, reporting for Axios: Amazon confirmed Thursday that it will again sell the Apple TV set-top box and Google Chromecast dongle. The company had stopped selling the devices amid disputes with both giants. There's a lot of frenemy stuff at play here, with Google, Apple and Amazon all selling their own streaming devices, but also looking to offer their own services on one another's devices. Apple doesn't offer its programing on rival devices, but does move a lot of hardware through Amazon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Fortinet VPN Client Exposes VPN Creds; Palo Alto Firewalls Allow Remote Attacks

An anonymous reader shares a report: It's been a bad week for two of the world's biggest vendors of enterprise hardware and software -- Fortinet and Palo Alto Networks. The worst of the bunch is a credentials leak affecting Fortinet's FortiClient, an antivirus product provided by Fortinet for both home and enterprise-level clients. Researchers from SEC Consult said in an advisory released this week that they've discovered a security issue that allows attackers to extract credentials for this VPN client. The second major security issue disclosed this week affects firewall products manufactured by Palo Alto Networks and running PAN-OS, the company's in-house operating system. Security researcher Philip Pettersson discovered that by combining three vulnerabilities together, he could run code on a Palo Alto firewall from a remote location with root privileges.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Trump Administration Just Voted To Repeal the US Government's Net Neutrality Rules

The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to dismantle landmark rules regulating the businesses that connect consumers to the internet, granting broadband companies power to potentially reshape Americans' online experiences. The agency scrapped so-called net neutrality regulations that prohibited broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for higher-quality service or certain content. The federal government will also no longer regulate high-speed internet delivery as if it were a utility, like phone services. From a report: Under the leadership of Chairman Ajit Pai -- and with only the backing of the agency's Republican members -- the repeal newly frees telecom companies from federal regulation, unravels a signature accomplishment of the Obama administration and shifts the responsibility of overseeing the web to another federal agency that some critics see as too weak to be effective. In practice, it means the U.S. government no longer will have rules on its books that require internet providers to treat all web traffic equally. The likes of AT&T and Verizon will be limited in some ways -- they can face penalties if they try to undermine their rivals, for example -- but they won't be subject to preemptive, bright-line restrictions on how they manage their networks. Meanwhile, the FCC's repeal will open the door for broadband providers to charge third parties, like tech giants, for faster delivery of their web content.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Space Is Not a Void

An anonymous reader shares an article: When President Kennedy announced the Apollo Program, he famously argued that we should go to the moon because it is hard. Solving the technical challenges of space travel is a kind of civilizational achievement on its own, like resolving an interplanetary Rubik's Cube. The argument worked, perhaps all too well. As soon as we landed on the moon, humanity's expansion into the cosmos slowed and then stopped (not counting robots). If you were to draw a graph charting the farthest distance a human being has ever been from the surface of Earth, the peak was in 1970 with Apollo 13. With the successful moon landings, we solved all of the fundamental challenges involved in launching humans into orbit and bringing them back safely. The people watching those early feats of exploration imagined we would soon be sending astronauts to Mars and beyond, but something has held us back. Not know-how, or even money, but a certain lack of imagination. Getting to space isn't the hard part -- the hard part is figuring out why we're there. Sure, we can celebrate the human spirit and the first person to do this or that, but that kind of achievement never moves beyond the symbolic. It doesn't build industries, establish settlements and scientific research stations, or scale up solutions from expensive one-offs to mass production. Furthermore, as five decades of failing to go farther than our own moon have demonstrated, that kind of symbolism can't even sustain itself, much less energize new activity.

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Internet Traffic To Major Tech Firms Mysteriously Rerouted To Russia

wiredmikey writes: Internet traffic to some of the world's largest tech firms was briefly rerouted to Russia earlier this week in what appeared to be a Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) attack. Internet monitoring service BGPmon noticed that 80 IP prefixes for organizations such as Google, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, NTT Communications, Twitch and Riot Games had been announced by a Russian Autonomous System (AS). It happened twice on Tuesday and each time it only lasted for roughly three minutes. The first event took place between 04:43 and 04:46 UTC, and the second between 07:07 and 07:10 UTC. Despite being short-lived, BGPmon said the incidents were significant, including due to the fact that the announcements were picked up by several peers and some large ISPs, such as Hurricane Electric and Zayo in the U.S., Telstra in Australia, and NORDUnet, which is a joint project of several Nordic countries. The incident is rather suspicious, as the prefixes that were affected are all high profile destinations, as well as several more specific prefixes that aren't normally seen on the Internet.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.